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Roasted Garlic Mashed Potatoes

Roasted Garlic Mashed Potatoes

Think of these Roasted Garlic Mashed Potatoes as the thick and rustic cousin of my – spectacular if I do say so myself – Creamy Garlic Mashed Potatoes recipe. I wanted to call it Roasted Garlic Red Skin Mashed Potatoes, but who wants to say all that?

Roasted Garlic Mashed Potatoes Ingredients

Feel free to jump to the full recipe, but here are useful notes about the ingredients you will need to make this Roasted Garlic Mashed Potatoes recipe:

  • Red potatoes: I dont recommed using russett potatoes for this Roasted Garlic Mashed Potatoes if you don’t have red: stick with the waxier varities, like Yukon gold. I like to use whole baby potatoes, but if you can only find regularly sized ones, chop them into even sizes before boiling.
  • Salted butter: A whole stick! You can opt for unsalted if you’re watching your sodium, but you’ll likely need to add more salt at the end. Depends on your tastebuds. I sometimes like to do an oven finish on mashed potatoes, where after I spread them into a serving dish, I dot the top with more pats of butter and broil it just til they’re melted and the peaks of the potatoes are starting to brown. It’s yummy!
  • Heavy cream, whole milk: You can use all half-and-half instead of this combination. If you go for plant based milks I’d use unsweetened oat.
  • Roasted garlic: Check out my recipe and video for it below or on YouTube. I call for 10 cloves, but you can use a whole head if you want! The more garlic the better, right?
  • Rosemary, thyme sprigs, flat-leaf parsley: These give the Roasted Garlic Mashed Potatoes a beautiful, herbaceous undertone.
  • Kosher salt, cracked black pepper: The basics. The salt amount might very greatly, especially if you eyeball rather than weight the potatoes. It’s always best to start with too little and add more, but don’t be stingy when salting the water the potatoes are boiling it, so the salt really permeates the skin and flesh.
  • Water: For boiling.
  • Equipment: The main things you’ll need are a colander, a potato masher, and a wooden spoon. Here’s everything I used:
Roasted Garlic Mashed Potatoes

How To Roast Garlic

You’ll need roasted garlic for this recipe, and it’s super simple to do. Below is the recipe from my digital cookbook ‘A deepfriedhoney Holiday‘. Above is a video on the method.

Ingredients: 2 heads of garlic, 2 tbsp olive oil

Method: Preheat your oven to 400°F. Separate the heads of garlic into individual cloves. Remove the papery outer skins, but leave the more smooth, tightly attached ones on. Toss the cloves in olive oil and wrap them loosely in aluminum foil. Roast in the oven on a baking sheet until softened. Begin checking at about 30 minutes – if you press a clove with your finger or the back of a spoon it should stay depressed.

If you need to roast them longer, remove any small, already roasted cloves so everything is evenly cooked in the end. When finished, pop the cloves out of their skins – they should just slip out with a shake or slight squeeze at the end. Leave whole or mash into a paste along with the garlic oil from the foil and keep in an airtight jar. Refrigerate or freeze for up to three weeks.

How to Make Roasted Garlic Mashed Potatoes

Full instructions are included in the recipe below, but here is a basic overview of what you’ll need to do, along with some important tidbits to help you make the most of this Roasted Garlic Mashed Potatoes recipe:

  • Boil the taters. Add your potatoes to a large stockpot and add enough water to cover them by about a 1/2″. Sprinkle in about 2 teaspoons of kosher salt and bring to a boil over high heat. Once the water is boiling reduce the heat to medium-high and simmer until the potatoes are fork-tender, about 15 minutes.
  • Infuse the cream. While the potatoes are boiling, add the heavy cream, whole milk, butter, rosemary, thyme, and about half of the roasted garlic to a saucepan over medium-high heat. Bring to a low boil, then reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Be careful not to overheat it, or it will boil over! After this, pour the liquid through a fine-mesh sieve to strain out the aromatics, pushing on the solids so some of the roasted garlic pushes through, and return it to the saucepan to keep warm over very low heat.
  • Drain the potatoes. The potatoes should be done around now: turn off the burner, pour them into a colander and give it a shake to drain them well, and return them to the pot. When the potatoes are fork-tender pour them into a colander and drain well, then return them to the pot.
  • Mash the taters. Next, grab a wooden spoon and a potato masher. Pour all of the infused cream into the pot, and add the remaining roasted garlic and salt, along with the minced parsley and pepper. Use the potato masher to mash the potatoes and the cream together, intermittently giving everything a good fold with the wooden spoon to make sure you’re mashing everything. Don’t be too rough or move too quickly, or you’ll risk making the potatoes gummy and thick. You want to leave chunks and large pieces of skin. Taste and adjust for salt, as needed. Serve hot. Dassit!

What To Serve With Roasted Garlic Mashed Potatoes

You can make endless variations with this Roasted Garlic Mashed Potatoes recipe, so please feel free to customize yours to taste!  For example, you could…

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Roasted Garlic Mashed Potatoes
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Roasted Garlic Mashed Potatoes

Roasted Garlic Mashed Potatoes


  • Author: María
  • Total Time: 45 minutes
  • Yield: 10 1x

Description

Chunky, creamy, garlicky, and delicious!


Ingredients

Scale
  • 5 lbs red potatoes, cut into 2-inch pieces
  • 1/2 C salted butter
  • 1/2 C heavy cream
  • 1/2 C whole milk
  • 10 garlic cloves, roasted (see above)
  • 2 rosemary sprigs
  • 3 thyme sprigs
  • 2 1/2 tsp kosher salt, to taste
  • 1 tsp flat-leaf parsley, minced
  • water, for boiling

Instructions

  1. Add your potatoes to a large stockpot and add enough water to cover them by about a 1/2″. Sprinkle in about 2 teaspoons of kosher salt and bring to a boil over high heat. Once the water is boiling reduce the heat to medium-high and simmer until the potatoes are fork-tender, about 15 minutes.
  2. While the potatoes are boiling, add the heavy cream, whole milk, butter, rosemary, thyme, and about half of the roasted garlic to a saucepan over medium-high heat. Bring to a low boil, then reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Be careful not to overheat it, or it will boil over! After this, pour the liquid through a fine-mesh sieve to strain out the aromatics, pushing on the solids so some of the roasted garlic pushes through, and return it to the saucepan to keep warm over very low heat.
  3. The potatoes should be done around now: turn off the burner, pour them into a colander and give it a shake to drain them well, and return them to the pot. When the potatoes are fork-tender pour them into a colander and drain well, then return them to the pot.
  4. Next, grab a wooden spoon and a potato masher. Pour all of the infused cream into the pot, and add the remaining roasted garlic and salt, along with the minced parsley and pepper. Use the potato masher to mash the potatoes and the cream together, intermittently giving everything a good fold with the wooden spoon to make sure you’re mashing everything. Don’t be too rough or move too quickly, or you’ll risk making the potatoes gummy and thick. You want to leave chunks and large pieces of skin. Taste and adjust for salt, as needed. Serve hot. Dassit!

Notes

  • If you’d like them a bit creamier, stir in 1/4 C of sour cream along at the end.
  • I cover my method for roasting garlic in the post above this recipe!
  • Prep Time: 5
  • Cook Time: 40
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